• It’s a relief that all the speculation drama is over.
  • This is the most important piece on Daring Fireball for a long, long time. Parts of it read like a lengthy article from a professional journalist at the New York Times or The Atlantic. That’s unusual, unexpected, but delightful.
  • Tim Cook’s efficiency mindset was the primary road block to this. There’s zero doubt of that in my mind. There has been an internal conflict in Apple for years now. The conflict in the abstract is this: do you focus exclusively on making the company more profitable or are you the people’s hero, the company that does the right thing simply because it’s the right thing? The paradox is that when you do the latter, that’s what makes people love you in a fanatical way, which in turn makes your company financially profitable in a way that could never happen if you focused exclusively on profit.
  • When did Apple start working on this new Mac Pro? I’d bet my bottom dollar that this decision was made in 2017. Not a day earlier. It took that long for people to convince Cook and those that shared his mindset to green light it. Building this Mac Pro to accommodate 1-3% of the Mac market is an unprofitable venture compared to spending that money on the iPhone. If I were at Apple trying to persuade Cook, my persuasion would have been focused on brand perception: that in the long run, Apple would lose more money not making the new Mac Pro than making it.
  • Regarding the question of why Apple didn’t update the Mac Pro sooner, that one’s easy. It’s the same reason Apple didn’t start building the new Mac Pro sooner. It’s because a portion of Apple really did plan on abandoning the Mac Pro. Don’t tell me with a straight face that everyone at Apple for the past 3+ years has been planning on continuing the Mac Pro. The gatekeepers couldn’t have cared less. And this goes all the way to the very top of the company. No, it took the outcry of the community through articles and podcasts and voting with their wallets to finally tilt the scales. And then once the company was committed to the Mac Pro once more, it made sense to give speed bumps to the preexisting one. Also notice how seemingly effortlessly Apple updated it, too. What did it take, a few hundred man hours total? That’s undeniable proof that if the company had been committed to the Mac Pro all this time, it would have done this years ago.
  • The fact that some people at Apple were against continuing the Mac Pro and others were for it explains why so many bright pundits fell to each side of the debate. We were getting mixed signals and we interpreted them differently. This is The Prestige writ corporate.
  • That Apple had unilaterally completely turned its back on the Mac Pro and standalone displays was something I never could convince myself. My gut was less based on evidence (other than the current Mac Pro not being discontinued) and more on a feeling of, there’s no way Apple would actually leave the Pro market.