This episode of The Talk Show is every bit as important as the WWDC opening keynote. Further, it’s more enjoyable because of how personable it is. You really get to see these three men in a way that you just don’t get to any other time of the year. iMore began to transcribe it and then gave up after the first 25 minutes or so, and bizarrely never followed up with the rest of it even though it promised it would. This must be because the official video was released shortly thereafter. Still, I’d love to be able to search the text from this talk, and it’s not up on David’s PodSearch tool yet. He’s actually a couple of episodes behind.

Here are some highlights from the show.

  • Interesting that the opening keynote was three and a half hours, before the team trimmed it down to 2.5 hours. But they did cover more than a podcast, in Schiller’s words. Burn!
  • These two guys are really smiling a lot at the beginning. They’re nervous, despite their position.
  • The care that Apple has over things like mail size efficiency isn’t a commonly discussed issue but it improves things behind the scenes. That’s what we love about Apple — its care to details, publicized or not. It’s my own fault, but whenever I hear about improvements to native apps like this that I don’t use, it’s painful because I know I won’t be a beneficiary. Perhaps the Airmail team can get some inspiration though. I know that whenever I open DaisyDisk and try to see where all my space has disappeared to, mail usually claims a good 5GB.
  • The story of an employee caught with an auto-playing video ad on a non-beta build of macOS in the very briefing for Safari’s autoplay block feature was hilarious.
  • Craig reads Daring Fireball very closely. When Gruber wrote that Chrome was faster than Safari, Craig had to go fact check and then declare on stage that Safari was faster than Chrome. I wonder at what font size Craig has cookied Daring Fireball. Also, what’s the likelihood that Schiller and Federighi have followed Gruber more closely in the past year after WWDC 2016, since they figured they’d have a good chance of being on The Talk Show again? I could see that.
  • Craig’s comment that “it takes longer to build things right” regarding privacy during machine learning and photo recognition is a diplomatic way to put the fact that Apple is lagging behind on AI.
  • File system upgrade: rolling everyone’s phones to APFS and then back to the old system during the upgrade from 10.2 to 10.3 - that’s some care right there. “Measure twice, cut once.” That’s exactly what Gruber told me when I asked him why he still had his site’s design in the dark ages. Regarding APFS though, it’s really true.
  • The fact that Bill Evans, 10 seconds after the keynote appeared announcing the new iMac Pro, sent an SMS to Gruber that “This is NOT the Mac Pro” shows you just how close this group is. They all have each other’s phone numbers and stay connected like that. I love inner circles like this.
  • iMac Pro: because there are people who like an all-in-one. That’s how the Mac got started. Good point, Phil.
  • External GPU kit. Wow. I’d missed this in the keynote. The world is moving to GPUs. The perf increase is way better than for CPUs. Schiller wants it to be clear that this is for the pro customers.
  • John f****** Knoll, Gruber says. And then he says he’s the inventor of Photoshop? Eh, that’s Thomas Knoll you’re thinking of, not John Knoll. They do look kind of similar. I like how nobody corrected him, because that would have gotten weird.
  • “Not tentpoles for new features but frameworks for developers.” Good positioning for the new kits that are being released. Apple is empowering devs to do amazing work. Not just giving them a walled garden with all the flowers already planted. That’s a very wrong misconception. The AR and VR stuff that we’ll see coming out later this year that is built on these kits is going to be incredible. I really cannot wait. Developers are completely stoked about AR. The room started raising a bit when this was announced, as Craig said.
  • This is all putting to rest the notion that Apple is done with the Pro market. Right on. Nobody can say that with a straight face now. And just wait until the Mac Pro debuts.
  • I had also completely missed the amazing smoothness that will come with 120 hertz on the new iPads. Definitely need to check this out in the stores when they hit. ProMotion display. It’s unbelievable? Jaw dropping? Must see this.
  • Dragging and dropping a file from one sandboxed app to another is a hard problem to solve in iOS, but it sounds like Apple has done it in a way that could not be more secure. I like Craig’s illustration of puncturing a user-driven pinpointed hole so that a sandboxed app can hand off another sandboxed app that file.
  • APFS instant snapshots. A “copy” in air quotes. It’s not a hard copy. I knew it! It’s a memory reference. That’s all. I imagine that it never does a deep clone. Think of it as version control. When someone goes to edit one of the two copies, it’s like a new branch on top of a master branch. The edit is like a commit with only that edit’s changes. That’s how you get around having to ever do a deep clone. Really smart. No reason a file management system can’t act like git does. Not in 2017.
  • Gruber has an astute observation. When you boot up a Mac, you’re in Finder. When you boot up iOS, you see apps. Huge difference between the two operating systems.
  • The voice for Siri is kind of like the typeface of a GUI. Great analogy. Love Craig’s story of the person who heard a new iOS 11 beta Siri voice over his CarPlay and mentioned the voice sounded great and then Craig had to act nonchalant about it so as to not give anything away.
  • “You no longer have to say ‘dingus’, Gruber.” Wow Schiller really listens to The Talk Show. Hadn’t realized these VPs followed DF that closely. Repeatedly amazed throughout the talk regarding this.
  • The bot vote on what Apple device Siri should respond. Amazon is already doing something like this but are its devices doing it locally or in the cloud? Schiller gives the impression that the competition is all doing it in the cloud. Fascinating that if you’re closest to a device, by default that device should be the one that responds to you, unless you had been talking to a different device prior to that, in which case that device gets weighed into the vote, presumably with a severe decay factor. Craig is a computer scientist. He loves nerding out talking about this stuff. And he really does understand to a certain technical level of depth a lot of how Apple’s products work.
  • Messages being backed up, encrypted end to end, in the cloud, with the encryption keys only being stored on your device, and the keys are rolled. Beautiful. The audience loves this and rightfully so. Apple is the tech company for privacy. It might be slower in AI innovation than the competition but I’d rather use something that isn’t at the very head of the curve but that will eventually get there than something that is in danger of getting hacked.
  • The ability that Schiller already talked about somewhere on some podcast, to choose whether you want to reset your rating or not as a developer when you submit an app update to the App Store. What podcast was that?
  • Interesting that the #1 thing Apple’s been begged to improve in the App Store is the discoverability of apps. You have the handful of huge winners and then everyone else mired in mediocrity to an extent. Giving better exposure to the long tail will make a lot of people happy, developers and consumers alike.
  • Schiller cares about the Mac App Store, just like he cares about the Pro market. I believe him. It’s just going to take time to ship an overhaul, and it made sense to do the iOS store first. I’m looking forward to ways that the Mac App Store improves. I just hope it isn’t too late when those improvements finally arrive. Then again, it’s never too late. If zero people are currently using the Mac App Store when it finally gets improvements, if those improvements are great, people will check it out just like they did on day one when it originally came out and had zero users.
  • Multidirectional source of the HomePods. Gruber had a hard time believing that all that sound was all coming from one place. iPod HiFi was before my time but I see the humor in its comparison.
  • The guy shouting “Make Siri better” during this part was being a jerk but he has a lot of support: a lot of people are complaining about Siri’s accuracy.
  • Leaks anger Apple, but this time around, very little leaked prior to the keynote. And the things that did leak came from the supply chain. Interesting to hear Schiller explain the reason why Apple hates leaks so much: because it steals the thunder from the developer teams who worked so hard and want to see people’s delight when their work first sees the light of day. That makes a lot of sense. But the funny thing is that when a screenshot leaks, I daresay it gets way, way more views from admirers than if it only shows in a WWDC keynote. How many people will read a “Here’s a Recap of WWDC” versus “Leaked Screenshot of Top Secret New Apple Software”? Maybe it’s just me, but I would actually prefer the taboo popularity of my work getting leaked out in little bits. Leaks enhance coverage; they don’t detract from it.